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Events for
2019
January 2019
  • Wed 16

    Predictive coding, inference and unsupervised learning An overarching theoretical framework is emerging that describes the brain as a predictive machine, which acquires internal generative models (mostly, in unsupervised way) and uses them to continuously infer what is out there (perception) and what to do (action). However, the theory is incompletely specified and different researchers have different intuitions about it. Furthermore, the ways the brain might implement predictive processing and inference remains poorly understood. This workshop brings together modelers and neuroscientists to develop a research agenda within HBP to study the mechanisms of predictive coding, inference and unsupervised learning (PRECISE brains). The 2-day workshop focuses on two main questions, of "formalizing precise brains" (day 1) and "testing precise brains empirically" (day 2).

    Organised: Giovanni Pezzulo (CNR), Cyriel Pennartz (University of Amsterdam), Lars Muckli (University of Glasgow) and Christopher Summerfield (University of Oxford)

    Information & Registration: https://eitnconf-160119.sciencesconf.org/

  • Thu 17

    Predictive coding, inference and unsupervised learning An overarching theoretical framework is emerging that describes the brain as a predictive machine, which acquires internal generative models (mostly, in unsupervised way) and uses them to continuously infer what is out there (perception) and what to do (action). However, the theory is incompletely specified and different researchers have different intuitions about it. Furthermore, the ways the brain might implement predictive processing and inference remains poorly understood. This workshop brings together modelers and neuroscientists to develop a research agenda within HBP to study the mechanisms of predictive coding, inference and unsupervised learning (PRECISE brains). The 2-day workshop focuses on two main questions, of "formalizing precise brains" (day 1) and "testing precise brains empirically" (day 2).

    Organised: Giovanni Pezzulo (CNR), Cyriel Pennartz (University of Amsterdam), Lars Muckli (University of Glasgow) and Christopher Summerfield (University of Oxford)

    Information & Registration: https://eitnconf-160119.sciencesconf.org/

  • Mon 28

    Workshop Modeling the Hippocampus Organised by Alain Destexhe & Michele Migliore

    - Information & registration to come soon -

  • Tue 29

    Workshop Modeling the Hippocampus Organised by Alain Destexhe & Michele Migliore

    - Information & registration to come soon -

March 2019
  • Wed 13

    Neural Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Workshop

    Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (or SLAM) refers to the problem of constructing a map of an unknown environment as it is actively being explored. SLAM has been treated extensively in mobile robotics, providing a rich theoretical framework within which to understand spatial processing in the brain. Equally, neuroscientific progress has uncovered many of the spatial representations used by the brain such as place, grid, head-direction and boundary cells.
    The aim of this two-day workshop, held at EITN Paris, will be to survey and contrast topics at the frontiers of SLAM in both robotics and neuroscience to identify novel cross-cutting areas of interest to both domains.
    Several aspects of function must be shared where both brains and machines are tasked with operating in the same complex environments. Yet, despite their commonalities, theories of navigation in robotics and neuroscience have largely evolved independently. Nonetheless, the rich literature (both experimental and theoretical) on spatial representations in the brain promises to provide novel insights into the SLAM problem. Conversely, robust testing in physically realistic environments and complex tasks, as is typical in the robotics domain and a central vision of the HBP, can further constrain biological models.
    Talks can consist of theoretical or experimental work if they provide insights into SLAM on a biological level. Approximately 80% of the talks will be invited. Contributions are therefore invited to fill the remaining 20%. Early career researchers are especially encouraged to apply. Topics will include, but are not limited to perspectives on active learning / sensing including reinforcement learning approaches, embodied and neurally-inspired approaches, systems / architectural / anatomical perspectives, front-end processing and multi-sensory integration by machines and brains. Contributions are invited from all sub-domains of the HBP.

     

    Confirmed speakers :

    Prof. Michael Milford (Queensland University of Technology)

    Dr. Allen Cheung (University of Queensland)

    Dr. Andrej Bicanski (University College London)

    Dr. Martin Pearson (Bristol Robotics Laboratory)

    Dr. Kshitij Tiwari  (Aalto University)

    Dr. David Buxton (University of Sheffield)

    Dr. Niel Burges (University College London)

    Dr. Talfan Evans (University College London)

    Dr.Benoit Girard(SU /CNRS)

  • Thu 14

    Neural Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Workshop

    Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (or SLAM) refers to the problem of constructing a map of an unknown environment as it is actively being explored. SLAM has been treated extensively in mobile robotics, providing a rich theoretical framework within which to understand spatial processing in the brain. Equally, neuroscientific progress has uncovered many of the spatial representations used by the brain such as place, grid, head-direction and boundary cells.
    The aim of this two-day workshop, held at EITN Paris, will be to survey and contrast topics at the frontiers of SLAM in both robotics and neuroscience to identify novel cross-cutting areas of interest to both domains.
    Several aspects of function must be shared where both brains and machines are tasked with operating in the same complex environments. Yet, despite their commonalities, theories of navigation in robotics and neuroscience have largely evolved independently. Nonetheless, the rich literature (both experimental and theoretical) on spatial representations in the brain promises to provide novel insights into the SLAM problem. Conversely, robust testing in physically realistic environments and complex tasks, as is typical in the robotics domain and a central vision of the HBP, can further constrain biological models.
    Talks can consist of theoretical or experimental work if they provide insights into SLAM on a biological level. Approximately 80% of the talks will be invited. Contributions are therefore invited to fill the remaining 20%. Early career researchers are especially encouraged to apply. Topics will include, but are not limited to perspectives on active learning / sensing including reinforcement learning approaches, embodied and neurally-inspired approaches, systems / architectural / anatomical perspectives, front-end processing and multi-sensory integration by machines and brains. Contributions are invited from all sub-domains of the HBP.

     

    Confirmed speakers :

    Prof. Michael Milford (Queensland University of Technology)

    Dr. Allen Cheung (University of Queensland)

    Dr. Andrej Bicanski (University College London)

    Dr. Martin Pearson (Bristol Robotics Laboratory)

    Dr. Kshitij  Tiwari(Aalto University)

    Dr. David Buxton (University of Sheffield)

    Dr.Niel Burges (University College London)

    Dr. Talfan Evans (University College London)

    Dr.Benoit Girard(SU/CNRS)

April 2019
  • Wed 03

    Mean-field approaches to the dynamics of neuronal networks

    Many physiological measurements such as calcium or 
    voltage-sensitive dye imaging, or local field potentials, sample 
    neuronal activity at the scale of populations of neurons. The 
    appropriate description for such mesoscopic (or macroscopic) scales 
    is provided by population equations, which can be obtained from neural 
    network models using mean-field techniques.
    In this workshop, we will review different mean-field approaches to 
    neural systems, with a particular emphasis on mean-field models of 
    spiking networks.

     

    Programme:

    3rd April

    9.00 - 9.30 Coffee and Croissants

    9.30 - 10:20 Alain Destexhe - TBA

    10.20 - 10.50 Coffee break

    10.50 - 11.40 Joachim Crevat - Rigorous derivation of a macroscopic model for the spatially-extended FitzHugh-Nagumo system

    11.40 - 12.30 Benoît Perthame - Integrate and Fire models, Elapsed Time model, conductance models: analysis and behavior

    12.30 - 14.00 Lunch 

    14.00 - 14.50 Delphine Salort - Some PDE models on neurosciences

    14.50 - 15.40 Pierre Gabriel - Analysis of the steady states in a leaky integrate-and-fire model

    15.40 - 16.10 Coffee break

    16.10 - 17.00 Nicolas Fournier - On a toy network of neurons interacting through their dendrites

    17.00 - 17.50 Eva Löcherbach - On systems of interacting neurons with short term plasticity

     

    4th April

    9.00 - 9.50 Hugh Osborne - Building Neuromuscular Circuits using MIIND

    9.50 - 10:20 Coffee break

    10.20 - 11.10 Matteo di Volo – Mean-field models for conductance-based networks with spike frequency adaptation

    11.10 - 12.00 Sima Mehri - Propagation of Chaos for Stochastic Spatially Structured Neuronal Networks with Delay driven by Jump Diffusions

    12.00 - 13.30 Lunch 

    13.30 - 14.20 Quentin Cormier - Long time behavior of a mean-field model of interacting neurons

    14.20 - 15.10 Eric Luçon - Mean-field analysis for FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators on an inhomogeneous random graph

    15.10 - 15.40 Coffee break

    15.40 - 16.30 Christophe Poquet - Slow-fast dynamics and emergence of periodic behaviors for excitable mean fields models

    16.30 - 17.20 Alexander Van Meegen - A bridge from large deviation theory to statistical field theory

     

    Register here: https://meanfield.sciencesconf.org

  • Thu 04

    Mean-field approaches to the dynamics of neuronal networks

    Many physiological measurements such as calcium or 
    voltage-sensitive dye imaging, or local field potentials, sample 
    neuronal activity at the scale of populations of neurons. The 
    appropriate description for such mesoscopic (or macroscopic) scales 
    is provided by population equations, which can be obtained from neural 
    network models using mean-field techniques.
    In this workshop, we will review different mean-field approaches to 
    neural systems, with a particular emphasis on mean-field models of 
    spiking networks.

     

    Program:

    April 3

    9.00 - 9.30 Coffee and Croissants

    9.30 - 10:20 Alain Destexhe

    TBA

    10.20 - 10.50 Coffee break

    10.50 - 11.40 Joachim Crevat

    Rigorous derivation of a macroscopic model for the spatially-extended FitzHugh-Nagumo system

    11.40 - 12.30 Benoît Perthame

    Integrate and Fire models, Elapsed Time model, conductance models: analysis and behavior

    12.30 - 14.00 Lunch

    14.00 - 14.50 Delphine Salort

    Some PDE models on neurosciences

    14.50 - 15.40 Pierre Gabriel

    Analysis of the steady states in a leaky integrate-and-fire model

    15.40 - 16.10 Coffee break

    16.10 - 17.00 Nicolas Fournier

    On a toy network of neurons interacting through their dendrites

    17.00 - 17.50 Eva Löcherbach

    On systems of interacting neurons with short term plasticity

    April 4

    9.00 - 9.50 Hugh Osborne

    Building Neuromuscular Circuits using MIIND

    9.50 - 10:20 Coffee break

    10.20 - 11.10 Matteo di Volo

    TBA

    11.10 - 12.00 Sima Mehri

    Propagation of Chaos for Stochastic Spatially Structured Neuronal Networks with Delay driven by Jump Diffusions

    12.00 - 13.30 Lunch

    13.30 - 14.20 Quentin Cormier

    Long time behavior of a mean-field model of interacting neurons

    14.20 - 15.10 Eric Luçon

    Mean-field analysis for FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators on an inhomogeneous random graph.

    15.10 - 15.40 Coffee break

    15.40 - 16.30 Christophe Poquet

    Slow-fast dynamics and emergence of periodic behaviors for excitable mean fields models.

    16.30 - 17.20 Alexander Van Meegen

    A bridge from large deviation theory to statistical field theory

     
     

  • Wed 10

    SPRING SCHOOL

    EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience

    Paris, April 10-19, 2019.

    Organized by the EITN

     

    The EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience consists of a 10-day course in theoretical and computational neuroscience, from cellular to whole-brain levels.  The course is structured in thematic days with lectures, tutorials, and project work. The course is typically aimed for PhD students or young postdocs interested to learn more about techniques of computational neuroscience, and the use of various simulation environments for model building.  The students will form thematic groups to work on predefined subjects, with the help of tutors.

     

    The course will cover cellular models, models of brain signals, circuit models and networks, mean-field models, and whole-brain models.  There will be lectures and tutorials associated to these topics.

     

    The course is free of charge, but the students interested must apply and be selected by our organizing committee.  The EITN does not provide help for travel, lodging or computers. Students are asked to bring their own laptop computer to run the models.

     

    The course will be at a location in Paris which will provide enough room and wifi access to run the course.  The address is: Rue de la Croix Nivert, 75015 Paris.

     

    Preliminary list of speakers and organizers:

     

    Cellular models and brain signals:
     Albert Gidon (Berlin University)
     Michele Giugliano (University of Antwerp)
     Huib Mansvelder (University of Amsterdam)
     Michael Doron (Hebrew University)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)
     Gaute Einevoll (Norwegian University of Life Sciences)
     Bartosz Telenczuk (CNRS)
     Marcel Stimberg (UPMC)

     

    Network models and brain circuits:
     Renato Duarte (Julich Research Center)
     Sacha van Albada (Julich Research Center)
     Christian Keup (Julich)
     David Dahmen (Julich Research Center)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)

     

    Mean-field and population models:
     Alain Destexhe (CNRS)
     Romain Veltz (INRIA)
     Marc de Kamps (Leeds University)
     Matteo di Volo (CNRS)

     

    Whole-Brain models:
     Viktor Jirsa (Aix-Marseille University)
     Spase Petkoski (Aix-Marseille University)
     Gustavo Deco (University Pumpeu Fabra)
     Matthieu Gilson (University Pumpeu Fabra)

     

    Projects:
     Christophe Verbist
     Renato Duarte
     Matteo Di Volo / Cristiano Capone
     Meysam Hashemi / Matthieu Gilson

     

    Please send a CV and a motivation letter (explaining why do you need to attend the course) to the following address:

     

     eitn@unic.cnrs-gif.fr  

     

    To register copy the following link into your browser:

    https://eitn-sscn.sciencesconf.org

    Then create an EITN account (on the right top corner) or login into your EITN account to register

     

    DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS : 25 March 2019

     

    Thanks

    Alain Destexhe (on behalf of the organizers)

  • Thu 11

    spring school

    EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience

    Paris, April 10-19, 2019.

    Organized by the EITN

     

    The EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience consists of a 10-day course in theoretical and computational neuroscience, from cellular to whole-brain levels.  The course is structured in thematic days with lectures, tutorials, and project work. The course is typically aimed for PhD students or young postdocs interested to learn more about techniques of computational neuroscience, and the use of various simulation environments for model building.  The students will form thematic groups to work on predefined subjects, with the help of tutors.

     

    The course will cover cellular models, models of brain signals, circuit models and networks, mean-field models, and whole-brain models.  There will be lectures and tutorials associated to these topics.

     

    The course is free of charge, but the students interested must apply and be selected by our organizing committee.  The EITN does not provide help for travel, lodging or computers. Students are asked to bring their own laptop computer to run the models.

     

    The course will be at a location in Paris which will provide enough room and wifi access to run the course.  The address is: Rue de la Croix Nivert, 75015 Paris.

     

    Preliminary list of speakers and organizers:

     

    Cellular models and brain signals:
     Albert Gidon (Berlin University)
     Michele Giugliano (University of Antwerp)
     Huib Mansvelder (University of Amsterdam)
     Michael Doron (Hebrew University)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)
     Gaute Einevoll (Norwegian University of Life Sciences)
     Bartosz Telenczuk (CNRS)
     Marcel Stimberg (UPMC)

     

    Network models and brain circuits:
     Renato Duarte (Julich Research Center)
     Sacha van Albada (Julich Research Center)
     Christian Keup (Julich)
     David Dahmen (Julich Research Center)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)

     

    Mean-field and population models:
     Alain Destexhe (CNRS)
     Romain Veltz (INRIA)
     Marc de Kamps (Leeds University)
     Matteo di Volo (CNRS)

     

    Whole-Brain models:
     Viktor Jirsa (Aix-Marseille University)
     Spase Petkoski (Aix-Marseille University)
     Gustavo Deco (University Pumpeu Fabra)
     Matthieu Gilson (University Pumpeu Fabra)

     

    Projects:
     Christophe Verbist
     Renato Duarte
     Matteo Di Volo / Cristiano Capone
     Meysam Hashemi / Matthieu Gilson

     

    Please send a CV and a motivation letter (explaining why do you need to attend the course) to the following address:

     

     eitn@unic.cnrs-gif.fr  

     

    To register copy the following link into your browser:

    https://eitn-sscn.sciencesconf.org

    Then create an EITN account (on the right top corner) or login into your EITN account to register

     

    DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS : 25 March 2019

     

    Thanks

    Alain Destexhe (on behalf of the organizers)

  • Fri 12

    Spring school

    EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience

    Paris, April 10-19, 2019.

    Organized by the EITN

     

    The EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience consists of a 10-day course in theoretical and computational neuroscience, from cellular to whole-brain levels.  The course is structured in thematic days with lectures, tutorials, and project work. The course is typically aimed for PhD students or young postdocs interested to learn more about techniques of computational neuroscience, and the use of various simulation environments for model building.  The students will form thematic groups to work on predefined subjects, with the help of tutors.

     

    The course will cover cellular models, models of brain signals, circuit models and networks, mean-field models, and whole-brain models.  There will be lectures and tutorials associated to these topics.

     

    The course is free of charge, but the students interested must apply and be selected by our organizing committee.  The EITN does not provide help for travel, lodging or computers. Students are asked to bring their own laptop computer to run the models.

     

    The course will be at a location in Paris which will provide enough room and wifi access to run the course.  The address is: Rue de la Croix Nivert, 75015 Paris.

     

    Preliminary list of speakers and organizers:

     

    Cellular models and brain signals:
     Albert Gidon (Berlin University)
     Michele Giugliano (University of Antwerp)
     Huib Mansvelder (University of Amsterdam)
     Michael Doron (Hebrew University)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)
     Gaute Einevoll (Norwegian University of Life Sciences)
     Bartosz Telenczuk (CNRS)
     Marcel Stimberg (UPMC)

     

    Network models and brain circuits:
     Renato Duarte (Julich Research Center)
     Sacha van Albada (Julich Research Center)
     Christian Keup (Julich)
     David Dahmen (Julich Research Center)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)

     

    Mean-field and population models:
     Alain Destexhe (CNRS)
     Romain Veltz (INRIA)
     Marc de Kamps (Leeds University)
     Matteo di Volo (CNRS)

     

    Whole-Brain models:
     Viktor Jirsa (Aix-Marseille University)
     Spase Petkoski (Aix-Marseille University)
     Gustavo Deco (University Pumpeu Fabra)
     Matthieu Gilson (University Pumpeu Fabra)

     

    Projects:
     Christophe Verbist
     Renato Duarte
     Matteo Di Volo / Cristiano Capone
     Meysam Hashemi / Matthieu Gilson

     

    Please send a CV and a motivation letter (explaining why do you need to attend the course) to the following address:

     

     eitn@unic.cnrs-gif.fr  

     

    To register copy the following link into your browser:

    https://eitn-sscn.sciencesconf.org

    Then create an EITN account (on the right top corner) or login into your EITN account to register

     

    DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS : 25 March 2019

     

    Thanks

    Alain Destexhe (on behalf of the organizers)

  • Mon 15

    Spring school

    EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience

    Paris, April 10-19, 2019.

    Organized by the EITN

     

    The EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience consists of a 10-day course in theoretical and computational neuroscience, from cellular to whole-brain levels.  The course is structured in thematic days with lectures, tutorials, and project work. The course is typically aimed for PhD students or young postdocs interested to learn more about techniques of computational neuroscience, and the use of various simulation environments for model building.  The students will form thematic groups to work on predefined subjects, with the help of tutors.

     

    The course will cover cellular models, models of brain signals, circuit models and networks, mean-field models, and whole-brain models.  There will be lectures and tutorials associated to these topics.

     

    The course is free of charge, but the students interested must apply and be selected by our organizing committee.  The EITN does not provide help for travel, lodging or computers. Students are asked to bring their own laptop computer to run the models.

     

    The course will be at a location in Paris which will provide enough room and wifi access to run the course.  The address is: Rue de la Croix Nivert, 75015 Paris.

     

    Preliminary list of speakers and organizers:

     

    Cellular models and brain signals:
     Albert Gidon (Berlin University)
     Michele Giugliano (University of Antwerp)
     Huib Mansvelder (University of Amsterdam)
     Michael Doron (Hebrew University)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)
     Gaute Einevoll (Norwegian University of Life Sciences)
     Bartosz Telenczuk (CNRS)
     Marcel Stimberg (UPMC)

     

    Network models and brain circuits:
     Renato Duarte (Julich Research Center)
     Sacha van Albada (Julich Research Center)
     Christian Keup (Julich)
     David Dahmen (Julich Research Center)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)

     

    Mean-field and population models:
     Alain Destexhe (CNRS)
     Romain Veltz (INRIA)
     Marc de Kamps (Leeds University)
     Matteo di Volo (CNRS)

     

    Whole-Brain models:
     Viktor Jirsa (Aix-Marseille University)
     Spase Petkoski (Aix-Marseille University)
     Gustavo Deco (University Pumpeu Fabra)
     Matthieu Gilson (University Pumpeu Fabra)

     

    Projects:
     Christophe Verbist
     Renato Duarte
     Matteo Di Volo / Cristiano Capone
     Meysam Hashemi / Matthieu Gilson

     

    Please send a CV and a motivation letter (explaining why do you need to attend the course) to the following address:

     

     eitn@unic.cnrs-gif.fr  

     

    To register copy the following link into your browser:

    https://eitn-sscn.sciencesconf.org

    Then create an EITN account (on the right top corner) or login into your EITN account to register

     

    DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS : 25 March 2019

     

    Thanks

    Alain Destexhe (on behalf of the organizers)

  • Tue 16

    Spring school

    EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience

    Paris, April 10-19, 2019.

    Organized by the EITN

     

    The EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience consists of a 10-day course in theoretical and computational neuroscience, from cellular to whole-brain levels.  The course is structured in thematic days with lectures, tutorials, and project work. The course is typically aimed for PhD students or young postdocs interested to learn more about techniques of computational neuroscience, and the use of various simulation environments for model building.  The students will form thematic groups to work on predefined subjects, with the help of tutors.

     

    The course will cover cellular models, models of brain signals, circuit models and networks, mean-field models, and whole-brain models.  There will be lectures and tutorials associated to these topics.

     

    The course is free of charge, but the students interested must apply and be selected by our organizing committee.  The EITN does not provide help for travel, lodging or computers. Students are asked to bring their own laptop computer to run the models.

     

    The course will be at a location in Paris which will provide enough room and wifi access to run the course.  The address is: Rue de la Croix Nivert, 75015 Paris.

     

    Preliminary list of speakers and organizers:

     

    Cellular models and brain signals:
     Albert Gidon (Berlin University)
     Michele Giugliano (University of Antwerp)
     Huib Mansvelder (University of Amsterdam)
     Michael Doron (Hebrew University)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)
     Gaute Einevoll (Norwegian University of Life Sciences)
     Bartosz Telenczuk (CNRS)
     Marcel Stimberg (UPMC)

     

    Network models and brain circuits:
     Renato Duarte (Julich Research Center)
     Sacha van Albada (Julich Research Center)
     Christian Keup (Julich)
     David Dahmen (Julich Research Center)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)

     

    Mean-field and population models:
     Alain Destexhe (CNRS)
     Romain Veltz (INRIA)
     Marc de Kamps (Leeds University)
     Matteo di Volo (CNRS)

     

    Whole-Brain models:
     Viktor Jirsa (Aix-Marseille University)
     Spase Petkoski (Aix-Marseille University)
     Gustavo Deco (University Pumpeu Fabra)
     Matthieu Gilson (University Pumpeu Fabra)

     

    Projects:
     Christophe Verbist
     Renato Duarte
     Matteo Di Volo / Cristiano Capone
     Meysam Hashemi / Matthieu Gilson

     

    Please send a CV and a motivation letter (explaining why do you need to attend the course) to the following address:

     

     eitn@unic.cnrs-gif.fr  

     

    To register copy the following link into your browser:

    https://eitn-sscn.sciencesconf.org

    Then create an EITN account (on the right top corner) or login into your EITN account to register

     

    DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS : 25 March 2019

     

    Thanks

    Alain Destexhe (on behalf of the organizers)

  • Wed 17

    Spring school

    EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience

    Paris, April 10-19, 2019.

    Organized by the EITN

     

    The EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience consists of a 10-day course in theoretical and computational neuroscience, from cellular to whole-brain levels.  The course is structured in thematic days with lectures, tutorials, and project work. The course is typically aimed for PhD students or young postdocs interested to learn more about techniques of computational neuroscience, and the use of various simulation environments for model building.  The students will form thematic groups to work on predefined subjects, with the help of tutors.

     

    The course will cover cellular models, models of brain signals, circuit models and networks, mean-field models, and whole-brain models.  There will be lectures and tutorials associated to these topics.

     

    The course is free of charge, but the students interested must apply and be selected by our organizing committee.  The EITN does not provide help for travel, lodging or computers. Students are asked to bring their own laptop computer to run the models.

     

    The course will be at a location in Paris which will provide enough room and wifi access to run the course.  The address is: Rue de la Croix Nivert, 75015 Paris.

     

    Preliminary list of speakers and organizers:

     

    Cellular models and brain signals:
     Albert Gidon (Berlin University)
     Michele Giugliano (University of Antwerp)
     Huib Mansvelder (University of Amsterdam)
     Michael Doron (Hebrew University)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)
     Gaute Einevoll (Norwegian University of Life Sciences)
     Bartosz Telenczuk (CNRS)
     Marcel Stimberg (UPMC)

     

    Network models and brain circuits:
     Renato Duarte (Julich Research Center)
     Sacha van Albada (Julich Research Center)
     Christian Keup (Julich)
     David Dahmen (Julich Research Center)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)

     

    Mean-field and population models:
     Alain Destexhe (CNRS)
     Romain Veltz (INRIA)
     Marc de Kamps (Leeds University)
     Matteo di Volo (CNRS)

     

    Whole-Brain models:
     Viktor Jirsa (Aix-Marseille University)
     Spase Petkoski (Aix-Marseille University)
     Gustavo Deco (University Pumpeu Fabra)
     Matthieu Gilson (University Pumpeu Fabra)

     

    Projects:
     Christophe Verbist
     Renato Duarte
     Matteo Di Volo / Cristiano Capone
     Meysam Hashemi / Matthieu Gilson

     

    Please send a CV and a motivation letter (explaining why do you need to attend the course) to the following address:

     

     eitn@unic.cnrs-gif.fr  

     

    To register copy the following link into your browser:

    https://eitn-sscn.sciencesconf.org

    Then create an EITN account (on the right top corner) or login into your EITN account to register

     

    DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS : 25 March 2019

     

    Thanks

    Alain Destexhe (on behalf of the organizers)

  • Thu 18

    Spring school

    EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience

    Paris, April 10-19, 2019.

    Organized by the EITN

     

    The EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience consists of a 10-day course in theoretical and computational neuroscience, from cellular to whole-brain levels.  The course is structured in thematic days with lectures, tutorials, and project work. The course is typically aimed for PhD students or young postdocs interested to learn more about techniques of computational neuroscience, and the use of various simulation environments for model building.  The students will form thematic groups to work on predefined subjects, with the help of tutors.

     

    The course will cover cellular models, models of brain signals, circuit models and networks, mean-field models, and whole-brain models.  There will be lectures and tutorials associated to these topics.

     

    The course is free of charge, but the students interested must apply and be selected by our organizing committee.  The EITN does not provide help for travel, lodging or computers. Students are asked to bring their own laptop computer to run the models.

     

    The course will be at a location in Paris which will provide enough room and wifi access to run the course.  The address is: Rue de la Croix Nivert, 75015 Paris.

     

    Preliminary list of speakers and organizers:

     

    Cellular models and brain signals:
     Albert Gidon (Berlin University)
     Michele Giugliano (University of Antwerp)
     Huib Mansvelder (University of Amsterdam)
     Michael Doron (Hebrew University)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)
     Gaute Einevoll (Norwegian University of Life Sciences)
     Bartosz Telenczuk (CNRS)
     Marcel Stimberg (UPMC)

     

    Network models and brain circuits:
     Renato Duarte (Julich Research Center)
     Sacha van Albada (Julich Research Center)
     Christian Keup (Julich)
     David Dahmen (Julich Research Center)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)

     

    Mean-field and population models:
     Alain Destexhe (CNRS)
     Romain Veltz (INRIA)
     Marc de Kamps (Leeds University)
     Matteo di Volo (CNRS)

     

    Whole-Brain models:
     Viktor Jirsa (Aix-Marseille University)
     Spase Petkoski (Aix-Marseille University)
     Gustavo Deco (University Pumpeu Fabra)
     Matthieu Gilson (University Pumpeu Fabra)

     

    Projects:
     Christophe Verbist
     Renato Duarte
     Matteo Di Volo / Cristiano Capone
     Meysam Hashemi / Matthieu Gilson

     

    Please send a CV and a motivation letter (explaining why do you need to attend the course) to the following address:

     

     eitn@unic.cnrs-gif.fr  

     

    To register copy the following link into your browser:

    https://eitn-sscn.sciencesconf.org

    Then create an EITN account (on the right top corner) or login into your EITN account to register

     

    DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS : 25 March 2019

     

    Thanks

    Alain Destexhe (on behalf of the organizers)

  • Fri 19

    Spring school

    EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience

    Paris, April 10-19, 2019.

    Organized by the EITN

     

    The EITN Spring School in Computational Neuroscience consists of a 10-day course in theoretical and computational neuroscience, from cellular to whole-brain levels.  The course is structured in thematic days with lectures, tutorials, and project work. The course is typically aimed for PhD students or young postdocs interested to learn more about techniques of computational neuroscience, and the use of various simulation environments for model building.  The students will form thematic groups to work on predefined subjects, with the help of tutors.

     

    The course will cover cellular models, models of brain signals, circuit models and networks, mean-field models, and whole-brain models.  There will be lectures and tutorials associated to these topics.

     

    The course is free of charge, but the students interested must apply and be selected by our organizing committee.  The EITN does not provide help for travel, lodging or computers. Students are asked to bring their own laptop computer to run the models.

     

    The course will be at a location in Paris which will provide enough room and wifi access to run the course.  The address is: Rue de la Croix Nivert, 75015 Paris.

     

    Preliminary list of speakers and organizers:

     

    Cellular models and brain signals:
     Albert Gidon (Berlin University)
     Michele Giugliano (University of Antwerp)
     Huib Mansvelder (University of Amsterdam)
     Michael Doron (Hebrew University)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)
     Gaute Einevoll (Norwegian University of Life Sciences)
     Bartosz Telenczuk (CNRS)
     Marcel Stimberg (UPMC)

     

    Network models and brain circuits:
     Renato Duarte (Julich Research Center)
     Sacha van Albada (Julich Research Center)
     Christian Keup (Julich)
     David Dahmen (Julich Research Center)
     Alexander van Meegen (Julich Research Center)

     

    Mean-field and population models:
     Alain Destexhe (CNRS)
     Romain Veltz (INRIA)
     Marc de Kamps (Leeds University)
     Matteo di Volo (CNRS)

     

    Whole-Brain models:
     Viktor Jirsa (Aix-Marseille University)
     Spase Petkoski (Aix-Marseille University)
     Gustavo Deco (University Pumpeu Fabra)
     Matthieu Gilson (University Pumpeu Fabra)

     

    Projects:
     Christophe Verbist
     Renato Duarte
     Matteo Di Volo / Cristiano Capone
     Meysam Hashemi / Matthieu Gilson

     

    Please send a CV and a motivation letter (explaining why do you need to attend the course) to the following address:

     

     eitn@unic.cnrs-gif.fr  

     

    To register copy the following link into your browser:

    https://eitn-sscn.sciencesconf.org

    Then create an EITN account (on the right top corner) or login into your EITN account to register

     

    DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS : 25 March 2019

     

    Thanks

    Alain Destexhe (on behalf of the organizers)

June 2019
  • Thu 06

    Workshop on visuo-motor integration

    How does the brain coordinate visually guided actions enabling agents to meaningfully interact with a dynamic environment?  Can solutions developed by A.I. serve as models of visuomotor integration? Can we utilize neuroscientific insights to build robots capable of smoothly interacting with its environment?

    This workshop aims at revisiting the complete visuomotor loop, from visual perception to motor control. Over the decades, neuroscience has created separate models and theories for individual functional components of the sensory-action path, e.g., for visual recognition, attention and eye-movement control. However, to gain a deeper insight into visomotor integration and in order to build a performant robot it is essential to understand how those components interact and produce meaningful behaviour.

    The workshop will discuss the status of the Co-Design Project #4 of the Human Brain Project and its further directions.

    The event is open to the HBP community and external attendees. Registration is free of charge but will be subject to approval.

    Information & Registration : https://visuomotor.sciencesconf.org
    Program :

    The workshop will consist of four half-day sessions, each ending with time for open discussions:

    • Session I: Visual perception. From the retina to visual recognition

    • Session II: Eye-movements and saccade motor control

    • Session III: Motor action and its neurorobotics implementation

    • Session IV: Validation and general discussion

    Organisers :

    Gorka Zamora-López (UPF), Olivier Marre (UPMC), Mario Senden (UM) and Fabrice Morin (TUM).

    Speakers :
    • Bruno Cessac (Centre de Recherche INRIA Sophia Antipolis – Méditerranée)

    • Ignasi Cos (Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona)

    • Andrej Bicanski (University College London)

    Contributed by HBP-CDP4 partners:

    • Olivier Marre (Institut de la Vision, Paris)

    • Junji Ito (Forschunzentrum Jülich)

    • Benedikt Feldotto (Technical University of Munich)

    • Matteo Di Volo (CNRS)

     

    • Alexander Kroner (Maastricht University)

    • Danny Da Costa (Maastricht University)

    • Vaishnavi Narayanan (Maastricht University)

    • Anno Kurth (Forschunzentrum Jülich)

    • Aitor Morales-Gregorio (Forschunzentrum Jülich)

    • Lorenzo Vannucci (Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa)

    Location :

    Espace MONCASSIN
    164 Rue de Javel
    75015 PARIS

    Close to the metro station "Félix Faure" (Metro n°8)

     

November 2019
  • Wed 06

    Roles and Mechanisms of Cortico-cortical Feedback

    Computational models inspired by the architecture of the visual cortex have recently taken a huge leap, beating humans in many image analysis tasks.

    Still most of these models are based on pure feedforward connectivity, while half of the connections between cortical areas are running in the feedback directions. A major question therefore remains what the additional value of  feedback connections could be, and how to properly implement them in a computational model. This workshop bring together computational as well as experimental neuroscientists to attempt to provide the state-of-the-art on the topic.

    Speakers:
    • Sacha van Albada (Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Jülich)
    • Pieter Roelfsema (Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Amsterdam)
    • Lars Muckli (Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow)
       
    • Kohitij Kar (McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Boston)
    • Lauri Nurminen (Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, USA)
    • Andreas Burkhalter (Washington University, St. Louis)
    • Kenneth Knoblauch (Stem-cell and Brain Research Institute, Lyon)
    • Grace Lindsay (University College London)
    • Leopoldo Petreanu (Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, Lisbon)
    • Lindsey Glickfeld (Duke University, Dept. of Neurobiology, Durham)
    • Ad Aertsen (Bernstein Center Freiburg, University Freiburg)
    • Jorge Mejias (Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences, University of Amsterdam)
    Organizers:

    Timo van Kerkoerle (NeuroSpin) and Alain Destexhe (CNRS)

     Information : https://mechanisms.sciencesconf.org/

    Registration is now closed. We have reached the maximum number of registrations for the workshop. Only people who have received a confirmation can attend to the workshop. Thank you for your interest.

    Location:

    74 rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine
    75012 Paris
    Close to the metro station "Ledru-Rollin" (Metro n°8) and "Bastille" (Metro n°1)

  • Tue 26

    Perception and attention mechanisms in the primate brain: An integrated, multi-component perspective

    The main goal of the Workshop is that of boosting an active and stimulating debate, the exchange of different views and expertise, and a concrete and generative connection between experts in the field to jointly reach a deeper grasp in understanding and modelling attention.

     

    A recently funded HBP Partnering Project, the MAC-Brain Project, coordinated by Professor Leonardo Chelazzi, has proposed an innovative and systematic approach to the study of the multiple priority signals that guide attention in the primate brain and, most crucially, of their interaction; in short, MAC-Brain is aimed at developing an integrated theoretical account of attentional control in the human and macaque brain.

     

    As proposed by Professor Lars Muckli, who also took the role of internal HBP supervisor for the mentioned PP, and in light of the enormous opportunity for scientific growth that resides in scientific exchanges, MAC-Brain is actively seeking collaborations and interactions, as the most critical and important tool to achieve framing of any foreseen theoretical advancement into the broader perspective of the HBP Flagship.

     

    The Workshop is organized in collaboration with Prof. Alain Destexhe and the EITN Team and will bring together scientists who investigate perceptual and attentional processing and decision-making. The possibility of exchanging information and perspectives with these researchers, using complementary methods and experimental approaches, will allow for a comprehensive picture of the neural and cognitive mechanisms underlying attention and for a successful translation of research evidence into a comprehensive computational framework.

     

    We hope that the Workshop will set solid grounds for the establishment of research networks linking scientists with complementary state-of-the-art methodologies and common scientific interests, devoted to the study of brain mechanisms underlying cognitive functions.

     

    The registration is free however mandatory due to a limited number of places.
     

    Preliminary list of speakers :
    • Leonardo Chelazzi (Dept. Neuroscience - University of Verona)
    • Lars Muckli (Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow)
    • Emiliano Macaluso (Lyon Neuroscience Research Center)
    • Suliann Ben Hamed (Institut des Sciences Cognitives Marc Jeannerod, Lyon)
    • Einat Rashal (Ghent University – Dept. of Experimental Psychology)
    • Matthew Self (Dept.  of Vision & Cognition - Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience)
    • Goebel, Rainer (Cognitive Neuroscience - Maastricht University)
    • Dominik Dold (Heidelberg University)
    • Junji Ito (Dept. Computational and Systems Neuroscience - Forschungszentrum Jülich)
    • Rossana Serpe (Dep.Neurosciences, Biomedicine and Movement Science - University of Verona)
    • Carola Dolci (Dep.Neurosciences, Biomedicine and Movement Science - University of Verona)
    Organizers:

    Lars Muckli (Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow), Elisa Santandrea (University of Verona) & Alain Destexhe (CNRS)

     

    Information : https://perception.sciencesconf.org/

    Registration is now closed.

    Location:

    Espace vocation République
    22 rue René Boulanger
    75010 Paris

    The closest subway station is "République" (lines 3, 5, 8, 9, 11)

December 2019
  • Wed 04

    Network science for cortical circuits: specificity versus regularity

    When one thinks of the brain – networks of connected neurons and connected brain regions immediately comes to mind. Indeed, already in 1949, Donald Hebb suggested that the activity of connected cell assemblies underlie the engram, proposing biological mechanism for forming such assemblies. Hebb’s idea was recently validated by a set of ingenious optogenetic studies, showing that memory is indeed embedded in the activity of local microcircuits. But what is the anatomical structure of these networks? In particular, of local cortical microcircuits? This question is intensely studies using new experimental and theoretical approaches. From large-scale EM (“connectomics”) combined with machine-learning methods to the development of theoretical approaches to characterize the connectivity of local cortical microcircuits, using graph theory and mathematical topology. Multi-patch recordings in vitro from brain slices provided a wealth of new insights on the structure of cortical circuits.

    One key question is “what are the principles that govern network structure in cortical microcircuits? are the cell-to-cell connections highly specific or, alternatively, do these connections obey certain general rules?". This is the leading question in this upcoming EITN meeting, which will bring together renowned experts in what could be called “Network Microcircuit Science”.  In this meeting we will focus on:
    (i) What is known experimentally about the connectivity of local cortical circuits in both rodents and human?
    (ii) How to best analyze the “big data”-based cortical microcircuit topology?
    and (iii) Could we already extract, at these early times of “Network Neuroscience” the principles (specific or regular) that govern cortical microcircuit topology?

     

    Preliminary list of speakers :
    • Idan Segev (The Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel)
    • Moritz Helmstaedter (Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Frankfurt)
    • Huib Mansvelder (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)
    • Christiaan PJ de Kock (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)
    • Rodrigo Perin (EPFL, Lausanne)
    • Kathryn Hess (EPFL, Lausanne)
    • Jörg Geiger (Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin)
    • John Beggs (Indiana University Bloomington)
    • Javier Defelipe (Cajal Institute, Madrid)
    • Nuno da Costa (Allen Institute for Brain Sciences, Seattle)

      The registration is free however mandatory due to a limited number of places.
    Organizers:

    Alain Destexhe (CNRS) and Idan Segev (HUJI)

     

    Information and registration: https://network.sciencesconf.org/

     

    Location:

    Espace vocation République
    22 rue René Boulanger
    75010 Paris
    The closest subway station is "République" (lines 3, 5, 8, 9, 11)